Tesco and Asda hold out against ban on cheap barbecues after rival removed them from shelves


Tesco and Asda hold out against ban on cheap barbecues after rival removed them from shelves following warning over wildfires

  • Supermarkets are facing calls to stop selling disposable barbeques amid fires
  • Sainsbury’s is the latest to abandon the £2 grill products after calls by fire chiefs 
  • Marks & Spencer and Ocado have already suspended sales of the barbeques
  • Environmental campaigners are now calling on Tesco and Asda to do the same 

Tesco and Asda are under pressure to stop selling cheap disposable barbecues after Sainsbury’s became the latest supermarket to take them off the shelves. 

Sainsbury’s made the decision following calls by fire chiefs and environmental campaigners who have condemned the £2 grills for leading to wildfires at a time when Britain is facing its longest dry spell since 1976. 

Sainsbury’s said: ‘As a precautionary measure we are removing from sale all disposable barbecues until further notice. Safety is our highest priority.’ 

Marks & Spencer and Ocado have already suspended sales of the barbecues. 

Tesco and Asda are under pressure to stop selling cheap disposable barbecues after Sainsbury’s became the latest supermarket to take them off the shelves

The London Fire Brigade (LFB) praised the decision, saying: ‘The hot weather has made the grass tinderbox dry and the smallest of sparks could start a blaze. That’s why we’re working with retailers to stop the sale of disposable BBQs and are urging Londoners not to BBQ in parks.’ 

Aldi and Waitrose have stopped selling the barbecues, while M&S has suspended sales. Morrisons and the Co-op have stopped selling barbecues close to national parks. 

Keep Britain Tidy and the Country Landowners Association have also called for a national ban on sales of the single-use grills. Brighton council has also banned them from their beaches and parks, and Barnsley Council is considering a similar ban. 

The Met Office has raised the Fire Severity Index, which assesses how easily a blaze could spread, to ‘exceptional’ – the highest level – from Nottingham do

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